Neurolunch

The Neurolunch is a presentation of the work a student has done in their rotations or thesis research. A 10-minute neurolunch talk is given to the IPN after every rotation and a 45-minute talk is given once a year thereafter on the student's thesis research. Neurolunch provides students the opportunity to learn the elements of preparing and presenting a seminar.

We have recently added a rubric for evaluating the presentation skills demonstrated at Neurolunch. When you give your Neurolunch, please give the rubric to at least three faculty members to evaluate you. These faculty members should be part of your thesis committee or, if you have no formed one yet, other faculty with whom you can discuss the rubric. It is recommended that you go over the rubric with the faculty members after your Neurolunch, either at a committee meeting or one-on-one. This is intended to give you constructive feedback that you can use to improve your presentation skills. The rubric can be found here.

Post-rotation neurolunches

Following each of the rotations, students present a short (10-15 minute) talk that summarizes the goal(s) of the research rotation and presents any data acquired. While these talks should be thoughtfully prepared, they are not meant to be the equivalent of regular seminars at Neurolunch given by more advanced students.

Most, if not all, of the talk can be focused around the goals of the rotation, the significance and rationale for these goals, and the experimental approaches used to begin to achieve these goals. There is no expectation that substantial new data will be generated during the rotation. If new data have been generated, the presentation of these data will be most welcome (but not required!). A rough guide for a 10-15 minute talk might be to present 3-9 slides. A template is provided here.

Thesis neurolunches

In their annual Neurolunch, students are expected to present their thesis research to the program. This talk should be roughly 45 minutes and give an outline of their project, including background, rationale, methods, data collected so far, conclusions, and future directions. It gives students the opportunity to learn the elements of preparing and presenting a seminar and it gives the program the opportunity to keep up to date on research being performed in the IPN.

Recommended organization of talks.