Electives, 2nd Year

In the second year, elective course work is completed. Specific elective courses are not required. This gives students maximum flexibility in tailoring their training to their individual background, needs, and interests. 40 credit hours of graduate courses beyond the bachelor's degree are required by the IPN; students are expected to register for 9-12 credits per semester.

Below is the list of approved elective courses. Permission to take other graduate-level courses can be obtained from the chair of the Curriculum Committee.

Be sure to cross-reference courses listed here with those listed by the Registrar to ensure accuracy. Some course offerings may require communication with faculty.


Statistics and Experimental Design
IPN students are expected to have mastery of statistics and experimental design.  This is most often accomplished by taking a graduate-level statistics course.   Approved choices are:

NSCI-599 - Practical Data Analysis and Experimental Design

Forcelli & Wolfe
Fall - 3 credits
This course gives a practical, and totally non-theoretical, approach to data analysis and experimental design. It is taught by practicing scientists.
                 Syllabus

BIST-501 - Introductory Biostatistics: Experimental Design & Analysis

Gana
Fall - 3 credits
This course is designed for introductory biostatistical theory and application for students pursuing a master's degree in fields outside of the Department of Biostatistics, Bioinformatics, and Biomathematics. Students first learn the four pillars of exploring and displaying data appropriately, exploring relationships between two variables, issues of gathering sample data, and understanding randomness and probability. On these pillars, students then can develop the platform for statistical inference including proportions and means, multiple regression, and ANOVA.
 

BIST-502 - Applied Biostatistics

Korostyshevskiy
Spring - 3 credits
This course is designed for applied biostatistical theory and application for students pursuing a PhD in fields outside of the Department of Biostatistics, Bioinformatics, and Biomathematics. Students are expected to have understanding of 501 material. More advanced modeling for linear models, general linear models, ANOVA and ANCOVA, logistic regression, survival analysis, and sample size planning are included. 
 

PSYC-522 - Advanced Topics in Regression Analysis for the Behavioral Sciences

Ryan
Fall -3 credits
         

PSYC-523 - Continuation of PSYC-522

Spring- 3 credits

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NSCI-495 - Gene Transfer for Neurologic Diseases

Maguire-Zeiss
Fall - 2 credits
This course is designed to examine the use of gene transfer approaches to model neurologic diseases and as therapies for these disorders. We will discuss the most commonly employed viral vector platforms (e.g., lentivirus, herpes virus, adenovirus, adeno-associated virus), as well as, the use of these platforms in modeling neurologic diseases and in gene therapeutic approaches. Discussions will include an examination of both animal models of disease and human clinical trials.
Classes will meet once per week for 2 hours. Each class will consist of a short introduction by Dr. Maguire Zeiss followed by a discussion of a seminal paper in the topic area for the day. All class members will be expected to read the papers and come prepared to participate in the discussion. A final project will be due on the last day of course. This project includes a written document where the student describes in detail an experiment aimed at addressing a scientific question using a gene therapeutic approach. The student will also discuss this work in the form of a 10-minute presentation to the class followed by a question and answer period. Topics need to be approved by Dr. Maguire-Zeiss prior to the final presentation. 
Registrar's description

NSCI-502 - Cellular & Molecular Neuroscience / In-Depth

Wolfe
Fall - 2 credits
This is an in-depth extension of molecular and cellular aspects of NSCI-501. Taken in the 2nd year of the program. Readings and discussion of the primary literature comprise the course. There is an emphasis on studies that examine synaptic function, regulation, and development.  If you want to take this course, sign up with pre-registration in the spring of your first year.
Syllabus

NSCI-504 - Systems & Cognitive Neuroscience / In-Depth

Contact core 5, 6, 7 directors to set this up
Spring - 1 to 4 credits
This is a companion elective courses for NSCI-503. Readings and discussion of the primary literature comprise the course.
Registrar's description

NSCI-506 - Neuroscience Survey II

Malkova
Fall- 2 credits
Same as NSCI505, which, in adjacent years, always has a different list of speakers. Can be repeated in successive Fall semesters 
Registrar's description

NSCI-521 - Functional MRI: Theory and Practice

Van Meter Fall - 3 credits

Structural and functional brain imaging techniques are important tools for both clinical and basic neuroscientists. In this introductory course we will explore imaging methods (optical imaging, magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography) and discuss their application to clinical and basic neuroscience research during the lectures.

The beginning of the course will focus on the various imaging modalities used for structural and functional brain imaging, with each method illustrated by examples from the neuroimaging literature. This introduction will be followed by lectures covering the basics of image processing. In the second half of the semester lectures will focus on functional imaging, including experimental design, implementation, data acquisition and data analysis. The final paper will be a proposal for a functional imaging experiment including a review of pertinent neuroscience literature and discussion of the methodological issues. There will be a mid-term examination to assess the students' general understanding of the material covered in these lectures. The mid-term exam will compose 40% of the final grade, class participation 20%, and the final paper 40%. The course is open to both graduate and undergraduate students. Previous coursework in statistics and signal processing are strongly suggested.
Registrar's description

NSCI-523 - Brain and Language

Friedman, Ullman, and Turkeltaub
Spring; even years - 3 credits
This course is an introduction to the brain bases of language. Its primary goals are (1) to weave together basic concepts from linguistics, psychology, and neuroscience; (2) to introduce students to the study of brain and language (neurolinguistics); and (3) to present topics of special interest in this field. The course will begin with introductory lectures discussing basic issues and methods (including neuroimaging techniques) in cognitive neuroscience and linguistics. Next we will learn about the relation between the brain and the main domains of language: lexicon (the dictionary of words), phonology (the sound patterns of language), morphology (the grammatical structure of complex words), and syntax (the grammatical structure of phrases and sentences). These topics will be followed by examinations of the neurolinguistics of first and second language acquisition and processing, of reading, and of aphasia. Finally, several guest lecturers from the Baltimore/Washington area will present special topics in their areas of expertise. Most lectures will be followed by a class discussion, to be led by students. Throughout the course, multiple lines of evidence will be considered, including studies of people with acquired or developmental disorders (aphasia, neuro-degenerative disease, Specific Language Impairment, dyslexia, Williams syndrome), and investigations of brain blood flow (fMRI, PET), magneto-physiology (MEG), and electrophysiology (EEG/ERPs, cortical stimulation and recording).
Registrar's description

NSCI-525 - Functional Neuroimaging and Cognition

Eden
Spring - 2 credits

The course is designed to provide an overview of the application of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) to the study of human cognitive and sensorimotor processes. Principles of experimental design, statistical analysis and interpretation will be reviewed briefly at the beginning of the course. For the remainder of the semester journal publications of functional neuroimaging studies employing fMRI or PET will be reviewed and discussed. These are selected to cover a broad range of areas: vision, audition, olfaction, language (word naming, object naming, phonological processing), plasticity, working memory and learning, motor control, brain development and clinical applications.

The first few weeks of the course will provide a background in imaging, with an overview of the principles of imaging techniques and discussions of experimental design. Following this introduction, recent publications will be presented and discussed by the group. For several of these, weekly meetings will consist of a student preparing a brief ½ page summary and critique of a particular short paper and spending 30 minutes presenting the ideas to the group. This will be followed by a group discussion based on additional papers read by all of the students in the same area of study. For three or four of the weekly meetings, outside speakers will be asked to present their own paper and then students will have an opportunity to discuss it directly with the author.
Registrar's description

NSCI-526 - From Neurons to Behavior: Principles of Computational Cognitive Neuroscience

Riesenhuber
Fall - 3 credits
Seemingly without effort, the human brain solves computationally very complex cognitive tasks such as recognizing facial expressions, understanding speech, planning and executing sequences of movements, or choosing actions from a range of competing alternatives to maximize the likelihood of reward in a given situation. What are the neural mechanisms that give rise to these behaviors? Given that many cognitive tasks are too varied to be coded genetically, how does experience serve to modify processing at a neural level to improve behavioral performance? How can cognitive processing be optimized "on the fly" for particular tasks? This class will examine these and related questions, showing how cognitive processing across a variety of areas can be grounded in a small number of key neurocomputational principles. Emphasis will be placed on showing how these principles apply to a variety of cognitive domains, including vision, audition, memory, motor control, and decision making. The goal of this introductory class is to convey the underlying computational ideas with a minimum of mathematical overhead, stressing their usefulness even for areas of cognition where data are still insufficient to constrain quantitative models.
Registrar's description

NSCI-527 - Brain Networks and Cognition

Medvedev
Spring - 2 credits
This course will focus on the phenomenon of oscillatory processes in the brain networks and how our growing understanding of this phenomenon contributes to our current thinking and interpretations of brain mechanisms underlying cognitive functions. How do those processes come about and what role do they play? Are they an epiphenomenon or an epitome of complex brain processes?
Registrar's description

NSCI-558 - Molecular Mechanisms of Neurodegeneration

Mochetti and Moussa
Fall - 3 credits
This course examines the molecular basis of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease and Lou Gehrig's disease. The course includes discussion of mutations that cause familial forms of these diseases, and what these familial forms tell us about the sporadic forms.
Registrar's description

NSCI-601 - Topics in Synaptic Transmission

Wolfe
Spring - 2 credits
This course examines the molecular basis of synapse formation, regulation, and function. The format is a discussion of current literature with an emphasis on critical review and consideration of potential experimental approaches to further the field.
                 Syllabus

NSCI-905 - Tutorial: Special Topics in Neuroscience

Contact individual faculty
Fall and Spring - 1 to 2 credits 
Registrar's description

NSCI-920 - Teaching Practicum

Contact Drugs, the Brain, and Behavior course directors
Fall and Spring - 1 to 3 credits
In this course, students prepare and deliver lectures in a course (e.g., Drugs, the Brain and Behavior). Along with the lecture preparation, reflection on teaching strategies and pedagogy is required.
Registrar's description

BCHB-501 - Graduate Biochemistry

Jones
Fall - 4 credits
Registrar's description

BIOL-359 - Dynamical Processes in Biological Physics

Dzakpasu
Fall - 3 credits 
This course will cover biological ideas from a physical perspective. Students interested in taking this course will be physical science students who would like to think about cells and bio-molecules as well as life science students who are willing to use calculus. Our goal is to present the "big picture" ideas of biology using ideas and tools developed in first-year physics and calculus. This will results in a quantitative description of biological systems using basic physics and mathematics.
Registrar's description

BIOL-370 - Neurodisorders

Neale
Fall - 3 credits 
Some of the most intractable and devastating clinical conditions involve the disordered nervous system. These include emotional disorders, such as depression, schizophrenia, behavioral disorders, such as autism and Asperger's syndrome, and degenerative neurological disorders, such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's. Neurodisorders will assess what is known of the neurobiology underlying these conditions and the current pharmacotherapy for them. This upper level course will include independent reading of current literature followed by in class discussions and a term paper that explores a single neurodisorder in depth. Neurobiology is required or entry by permission of instructor. 
 

MICB-606 - Public Policy for Scientists

Richard Calderone
Fall - 3 credits
This interdisciplinary course will provide introductory lectures in a variety of fields that pertain to biomedical science policy & advocacy. Lectures will cover relevant federal agencies, prominent science advocacy groups and techniques, principles of health economics, funding of research activities, the interaction of science & industry, as well as some controversial issues in science policy such as biodefense, stem cell research, and climate change. Students will be left with a multi-faceted understanding of the environment that shapes biomedical science policy and the scientists' role in this arena. 
 

PHAR-510 - Neuropsychopharmacology

Kellar
Spring - 2 credits  -  Given on request

 

PHAR-528 - Modern Methods in Molecular Biology

Wolfe and Martin
Fall - 3 credits
Overview of methods utilized in recombinant DNA technology. 
                 Syllabus

PHAR-584 - Introduction to Pharmacology

Wolfe, Wroblewski
Fall - 1 credits
                 Syllabus

PHAR-588 & 589 - Drugs, the Brain, and Behavior I & II

IPN Students
Fall & Spring - 3 credits
                 Syllabus

PHAR-604 - Medicinal Plants and Pharmacognosy

Fugh-Berman
Fall - 3 credits
                 Syllabus

PHAR-611 - Pharmacology I - Basic Principles

Pak, Wolfe, Wroblewski
Fall - 4 credits
Registrar's description 
                 Syllabus

PBIO-534 - Cellular and Molecular Physiology

Sherman
Fall - 4 credits
               Syllabus

PBIO-547 - Molecular Neurophysiology

Vicini
Given on request- 2 credits
          Registrar's description

PSYC-501 - Lifespan Development: Brain and Cognition

James Lamiell
Fall - 3 credits
This course introduces graduate students to the key concepts of developmental trajectories and timing, malleability, plasticity and compensation and normal and abnormal development that are critical to understanding developmental changes in cognitive and brain functioning across the lifespan. The study of development generally, and cognition and brain functioning specifically, is by nature an interdisciplinary enterprise, so readings draw from psychology, neuroscience and related disciplines. The role of neuroscience findings and policy translation are considered throughout the semester. This is a team-taught class and is divided into 4 modules that cover embryology, infancy, childhood, and aging. The first module examines prenatal development including the use of embryonic development, prenatal assault and animal models. The second module examines infant cognition including memory and communication development. The third module covers cognitive neuroscience in school-aged children with a particular focus on executive function and dysfunction. The final module covers cognitive and brain aging. The intent in all four modules is to offer an overview of the constructs and some sense of the theoretical, empirical, and application issues. Each professor highlights the role that very different methods play in assessing cognitive and brain functioning, and covers some of these specialized methods, including animal models, nonverbal methods with infants, fMRI with children, and special considerations with aging populations. Offered Wednesdays 2:00-4:30 in the fall semester of even-numbered years. Registrar's description

PSYC-511 - Cognition

Green
Fall - 3 credits
       Registrar's description

PSYC-512 - Cognitive Neuroscience

Vaidya
Spring - 3 credits
          Registrar's description

TBIO-588 - Preparing a Scientific Paper

Wellstein
Spring - 2 credits
             Registrar's description

TBIO-595 - Tumor Endocrinology

Clarke
Spring alternate years - 2 credits